Placemaking can take on many theoretical definitions, but in practice, placemaking includes things like a farmers market, family-friendly parks, interesting small businesses, great restaurants, walkable downtowns, and streets lined with trees. Placemaking is what matters most to people.MIplace Pics

According to a Brookings Institute report, people cite quality of life features (like parks, events, and walkability) ahead of local economic health and job prospects when deciding where to live. And if people love where they live, they’ll actually spend more money. The Soul of the Community Report from the Knight Foundation found that there’s a correlation between how attached people feel to where they live and local GDP growth. The more people love their community, the more economically vital that place will be.

Outdoor marketHere at the Michigan Municipal League, we have clearly prioritized placemaking in almost all aspects of our work. Our core values, policy agenda, training events, and programming all center around place. The State of Michigan has also focused on placemaking for the past many years through the MIplace Initiative. The goal of MIplace is to help communities create more jobs, attract and retain talented workers, and raise incomes through targeted local and regional placemaking activities. Leaders in Michigan understand that placemaking is an important means to state-wide prosperity.

Placemaking Workshops

In an effort to continue to educate a diverse group of local leaders, the state has partnered with the League and Michigan State University to develop an in-depth training program, the MIplace Training Curriculum. This spring, MIplace is hosting more than 30 workshops across the state that go deep into placemaking education.

miplace logoWorkshop attendees can expect to leave with knowledge on the context for placemaking in Michigan, the economic benefits of place, and important elements of form, structure, and connectivity. In day-long workshops, attendees will also work with a place expert to develop a draft placemaking strategy specific to their community. Workshops are free and registration information is available on the MIplace website.

Not convinced placemaking is right for your community? The League is also available to speak with local leaders and do a short, 20-30 minute overview of placemaking sharing information, answering questions, and sparking some excitement! Feel free to contact me to schedule something in your community: scraft@mml.org.

 

 

 

The MSU Center for Community and Economic Development is hosting their annual Contemporary Issues Institute on the topic of civility: Cultivating a Civil Society in an Era of Incivility.

Civility Conference Info

Event participants will have the opportunity to learn from and discuss with innovative thinkers and doers from across the state on how to promote more civil behavior in personal, public, private, and online realms.

The event will take place Friday, March 6 from 8:30 AM – 12:30 PM in the Michigan State Capitol BuildingThe event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. Complete the short registration form here.

In order to get a great conversation going in each session, the planning team hopes to attract a wide range of attendees. People in local government, community leaders, business owners, planners, academics, students, and others are all encouraged to attend! Be prepared for interactive sessions with a chance to share experiences, challenges, expertise, and lessons learned.

State Representative Andy Schor is offering opening remarks and the Flint Youth Theatre will bookend the event with short, theatrical interpretations of civility.

Session topics include:

  • Our Individual Character
  • Putting Civility in Place: How Placemaking & Interior Design can Promote Civility
  • Theories of Civility
  • Media, Technology & Incivility

Putting Civility in Place

With the League’s emphasis on placemaking, I am excited to moderate the session Putting Civility in Place. Research tells us that place has a huge impact on how people feel and act. For example, people who live in high-rise apartments are less trusting of their neighbors than single-family home residents, being in nature boosts altruistic behavior, and students’ grades improve when their school is designed to increase human connection. To explore this topic further, we have the following speakers lined up to discuss how place impacts people, communities, and workplaces:

Feel free to spread the word about this event, and don’t forget to RSVP!Civility Registration Button

Open Jackson LogoAbout 80% of citizens are concerned with the accountability and openness of government. To help address this issue, open data has been quietly growing popularity for the past few years (also see open data mentioned in the League’s Year in Review blog). And if you haven’t heard about it yet, open data will certainly be a topic of discussion in Michigan throughout 2015.

According to the Open Data Handbook, open data is “data that can be freely used, reused, and redistributed by anyone.” But don’t worry, data isn’t just anything — it’s not email messages and it’s not personal information. This type of data is often public information governments already collect, but don’t always use to its greatest potential —  things like statistics on crime, education, waste management, street lights, and housing.

open dataThe big idea behind open data is that public information is shared in a format that’s easy for people (citizens, government departments, businesses, developers, etc.) to access and use. Taking a closer look at data can help increase government efficiency, transparency, and accountability, boost civic participation, and encourage economic development.

So far, the federal government, 16 U.S. states, and more than 30 local governments have adopted open data policies. The city of Jackson is the only Michigan municipality to adopt an  ordinance and the community is currently working with students from the University of Michigan’s School of Information Citizen Interaction Design program to establish internal policies to better implement open data strategies.

Because the concept is new to Michigan, the League wanted to get ahead of the game and compile a few useful resources for local leaders interested in learning more.

On our Open Data Resource Page, you’ll be able to find helpful open data publications, resources, and sample policies from across the country.

As communities discuss open data, be sure to keep the League in the loop! We’re glad to help collect information, examples, and resources to help leaders make the case, question, and explore open data.

Placemaker and CEO of Adelaide, Australia Peter Smith is coming to Michigan to speak at the Michigan Local Government Managers Association Winter Institute at the end of the month. Because he’s traveling so far, we figured we better take advantage of his time here with a fun, low-key, networking and information-sharing event in Detroit.1-26 event

Join the League at a networking and idea-mixing event with experts and practitioners who are passionate about building great communities.

Placemaking Happy Hour & Panel Discussion: Monday, January 26 from 4-6 PM at Seva Detroit

RSVP ButtonLook forward to great conversation and a cross disciplinary panel discussion moderated by Michigan Association of Planning Executive Director Andrea Brown. Panelists include:

  • Peter Smith, CEO of Adelaide, Australia
  • Alicia Marion-George, Co-owner of Motor City Java & Tea House
  • Sarida Scott, Executive Director of Community Development Advocates of Detroit
  • Steve Baker, Councilmember for the City of Berkley & IT Strategy and Innovation Lead at DTE Energy

The event is free and open to the public but space is limited so please RSVP here.

The League is pleased to host appetizers and there is a cash bar available. We’ll also be selling our new book, The Economics of Place: The Art of Building Great Communities.

Come for the event, but stay for dinner

Spend the evening in Detroit! Seva has a full dinner menu and there are plenty of restaurants in Midtown and within walking distance of the event, including: